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20130121
20130129
STATION
LINKTV 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
LINKTV
Jan 24, 2013 3:00pm PST
of this disease, depending on the variation of protein energy malnutrition that we see, can be as high as 30 to 50%. usually the children die from routine infections like diarrhea or pneumonia. in fact, pneumonia is the most common cause of death. children who are severely malnourished appear anorexic. they do not want to eat. they're often very depressed. their heads are low. they stop talking. they stop walking, and they're severely dehydrated and suffering from infectious diseases. perhaps the most extreme case of malnutrition the team witnessed was annis-- a tiny wisp of a girl, two and a half years old. annis is just skin and bones and a head. and i looked at her, and i looked at the weight, and i asked the mother how old she is and the mother told me. and i said, "it's not possible." so i took annis myself back to weigh. i saw the scale, it said 4.2 kilos, took annis off, measured her height, put her back on the scale. i still couldn't believe it. it was amazing to me that annis was still alive. the highest mortality for children so severely malnourished occurs in the first few days. if you
LINKTV
Jan 22, 2013 8:00am PST
the idea how energy relates to these things. it's the knowing how hot-- how much energy is gonna flow. and we get that idea. we make these distinctions. you guys know when you go on the top of the mountains, it's cold up there. but you're closer to the sun, right? in the top of the mountains, it's cold. and somebody say, "hey, how come it's so cold up here?" so--we're closer to the sun. wait, no, no, no. that should make us hotter. you guys know when you're approaching the sun, it gets hotter and hotter, don't you? have you known that? i mean, you can get in the best ceramic materials that the humans can make. you get within a million miles of that sun. honey, you're gonna fry to a crisp, a million miles from the sun, unless you go at nighttime. [laughter] hey, but the point, back again, you're up at the top of the hill and it's cool up there. and you know what you can tell your friends? hey, gang, you know why it's so cool up here? because warm air rises. let me ask you a question, does warm air rise? you guys know about that from before? did you guys know that you get in the top of
LINKTV
Jan 25, 2013 3:00pm PST
harnessing all other kinds of energy. during that long block of time from a couple of million years ago until the industrial revolution, there was a point about 10,000 years ago when human beings began to farm, began to practice agriculture, and that harnessed a lot more energy than was possible by just hunting and gathering wild resources. keach: in the old world, we know that agriculture sparked the development of the world's first cities in places like sumer in ancient mesopotamia. but how did farming begin in the new world ? when scotty macneish first came to the tehuacan valley in 1962, he was seeking the answer to one simple question -- did agriculture evolve here or was it introduced from the old world ? then we'll measure out from the corners. keach: in a stratum of the purron cave that had been laid down thousands of years later than those in which he found the hunters and gatherers, macneish made a discovery that exceeded all expectations. macneish: this is a corn cob, and it's a real little one. keach: it may have looked insignificant, but the shriveled ear dated to about 5000 b.c.
LINKTV
Jan 28, 2013 8:00am PST
job! children need to run, and they need to work off that energy. but along with that, we provide challenges for them. for instance, i would hope in an appropriate preschool you would always see a climber... and a climber having stairs, a climber having maybe a chain that they will have to problem solve and figure out how to move on that. so even though they are running off energy, they're also outside problem-solving, figuring out ways to move their bodies on different objects to promote that development. hendrick: vigorous play is the breath of life to children. our young people need to climb... crawl... run... balance... and hang from equipment. what would you do? how would you use your environment? what sorts of activities and equipment would you suggest that would help your children maximize their playtime? we have...sometimes we involve dancing in our lesson plans. we have things like the balance beam out, and that stimulates their coordination and their sense of balance. um...even going outside and running. so far, we have looked at how to provide an appropriate and safe en
LINKTV
Jan 21, 2013 5:00am PST
other sub budgets and a permanent energy. domestically, we have a much higher unemployment rate in 1968. we have more poverty absolutely and relatively and 1968. we certainly have more home foreclosures and more consumer debt. of course, 30 million workers are making today less than the workers made in 1968 adjusted for inflation. that is why we're launching this national drive to overpower congress and split the republicans in congress, organized and what the democrats, so tens of billions of dollars are poured into the community, into the long deserved pockets of these people, many of whom have children and they don't have health insurance or paid sick leave or big vacations. but they deserve $10.50 minimum wage, which is what it would be in 1968. no big deal. >> explain how that would work, how does an increase in the minimum wage actually work? >> 1, congress can pass it for all of the states. there is no competition between the states that way in terms of wage levels, no competition between businesses, etc. everyone would have to pay the same minimum wage. the other way is what has
WHUT
Jan 22, 2013 6:00pm EST
drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition, we must lead it. we cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and industries, we must claim its promise. that is how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure -- our forests and waterways, our crop lands and snow-capped peaks. that is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by god. that is what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared. we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [applause] our brave men and women in uniform, tempered by the flames of battle, are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, seared by the memory of those we have lost, know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we're also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into t
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6